Front perspective

Ryder Architecture, in partnership with Arup and MAKE, has won a commission to redevelop a large site off John’s Wood Road, overlooking Lord’s cricket ground. The site currently provides 202 bedsit apartments for elderly residents and is operated by C&C, a not for profit registered provider who offer housing, care and support to vulnerable people.  We will progress accommodation design for the over 55s to the south, while MAKE focus on 8,000 sqft of private residential to the north.

Peter Buchan, Ryder senior partner, said: “We’re delighted to have been selected to redevelop part of this prime residential site in London overlooking Lord’s cricket ground with Arup and MAKE.  It is a major scheme which underlines our credentials in residential housing, but also draws on our experience in healthcare and dementia.  With the growing needs of our ageing population, this is a market that will continue to require our expertise and this is provides a great platform for us to build on in the capital.”

The development will be phased so residents move just once, minimising disruption. Current proposals create 240 one and two bedroom apartments to house existing residents, with the surplus providing new homes for residents in Westminster. The accommodation will be based around clusters, avoiding endless double banked corridors. Each resident will have a clear view of their neighbour’s front door through the carefully arranged internal layout. Kitchens will overlook the internal atria running through each cluster. All apartments will be lifetime homes compliant and cater for residents with a variety of care needs, including early dementia. Working with specialists in the field of dementia we will provide an exemplar scheme.

Ground Floor Cafe
Ground floor cafe

The use of a high quality palette of materials contextualises with the surrounding mansion blocks, providing a subtle interface with Lord’s and Regent’s Park. With Arup and MAKE we will seek to achieve C&C’s aspiration for a homogenous architectural response to the split site, both in the overall massing of the blocks and the palette of materials chosen.